Tag Archives: Orange County VA

books

Have You Visited the New Local Bookstore: Bound2Please Books in Orange, Virginia?

Small Business Spotlight brought to you by: Virginia SBDC Central Virginia

Kathy Judge and Gerilee Hundt both love books and have spent their lives reading, editing, cataloging and dealing with books – so opening their own bookstore seemed like the next logical step. Bound2please Books opened in February 2019 in Orange, VA. The shop is 500 square feet filled with nearly 3,000 general interest titles and has a primary mission: to offer a place to gather, to share thoughts and stories and to keep conversation percolating in this electronic age. 

Most of the inventory consists of gently used titles in very good condition – which customers have appreciated – along with the store’s prices and variety. In the first six months, the store has already hosted several author visits – with the next, on Fri, Aug 23 at 5:30, featuring Lynn Coffey, author of the Backwoods series. B2plz Books has also made the space available for book clubs (Science Fiction gathering monthly), knitting (Tuesdays at 6:30), open mic poetry, game nights, and the occasional string band rehearsal! According to Judge, “The ship is sailing relatively smoothly so far, and we’re blessed with some wind in our sails.”

The grand opening.
Grand Opening

Bound2please Books began its relationship withSBDCby attending a digital marketing workshop, and later opted for one-on-one counseling, again focusing primarily on marketing. The staff is now working to increase its customer count through digital marketing and can be found via Google, Facebook and Instagram. Select titles from the store are available through their B2plz eBay store.


Gerilee (Lithgow) Hundt!
Owner, Kathy JudgeVintage poetry on consignment

Owner, Kathy Judge

Judge and Hundt’s love of books shows through, they have worked hard and had fun thinking of genres to curate – from science and philosophy to fables and fairy tales. “Bound2please Books is the kind of bookshop I’ve always wanted to spend time in, browsing the shelves, finding a comfortable place to sit and leaf through volumes that catch my eye,” comments Hundt.

VINTAGE POETRY on consignment
VINTAGE POETRY on consignment

Visit the Bound2please Books website!

Whether you’re looking for homes for sale in Lake of the Woods VA or Waterfront property in Virginia we are your Real Estate Advisors for Stafford, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Locust Grove, Central Virginia, and Greater Virginia. Thinking of selling? In any market condition, “what is my home worth?” is the #1 question asked by home owners. If you wish to sell your home, it needs to be sold for top dollar and in a timely manner. Pricing your home accurately, Pat will partner with you to make the selling process so much easier. Get started today by calling us at (540) 388-2541 or contact Pat Licata.

To see available Lake of the Woods properties, please visit our site.

chilli

Orange County’s 4th Annual Chili Cookoff, Brewfest & Corn hole Tournament

Saturday, October 12th from 11AM – 6PM. Join the Orange County Chamber of Commerce as they host the 4th Annual Chili Cookoff, Brewfest and Corn hole Tournament! The festivities will take place at the Orange County Fairgrounds located at 14500 Old Gordonsville Rd, Orange VA 22960.

Chili festival is always delicious with many participants submitting their chili; there will be local and regional craft breweries to quench your thirst and of course, don’t forget to particpate in the East Orange Ruritan Club Corn hole tournament. There are CASH PRIZES for the corn hole tournament and chili cookoff.

Tickets range from $25 – $140. Get more ticket info here. The VIP experience is supposed to be IMPROVED, including: unlimited craft brew tasting, PLUS a $10 food truck voucher, exclusive craft brews and even a MEET & GREET with the WORX!

105.9 SAM FM will be broadcasting the festival from 11am – 1pm and the Worx will take the stage at 1:30PM for your afternoon music entertainment.

Whether you’re looking for homes for sale in Lake of the Woods VA or Waterfront property in Virginia we are your Real Estate Advisors for Stafford, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Locust Grove, Central Virginia, and Greater Virginia. Thinking of selling? In any market condition, “what is my home worth?” is the #1 question asked by home owners. If you wish to sell your home, it needs to be sold for top dollar and in a timely manner. Pricing your home accurately, Pat will partner with you to make the selling process so much easier. Get started today by calling us at (540) 388-2541 or contact Pat Licata.

To see available Lake of the Woods properties, please visit our site.

History in Our Backyard Chapter 12: Beef on the Hoof

Both Napoleon and Frederick the Great have been credited with the saying “An army marches on its stomach.”  Provisioning an army, especially one that numbered over 125,000 – the size of the Army of the Potomac at the beginning of General U.S. Grant’s Overland Campaign in May 1864 – would prove to be a monumental logistical challenge.

Fresh beef – 1¼ pounds daily according to the US War Department Army Regulations – was an important component of the Federal Civil War soldier’s ration.  The most practical way to furnish beef to campaigning soldiers was to have herds of cattle march with the army.

Exhibit 16 Cattle Crossing the Rapidan River

So how much beef was needed?  An estimate given by Lt. Colonel C. W. Tolles in 1864 stated “A bullock will furnish about 450 rations, so that an army of 100,000 men needs over two hundred beef cattle for its supply.”  Based on 450 rations per head of beef, an army of 125,000 men consumed 278 head of beef daily.

At least 6,000 head crossed the Rapidan River with the Army of the Potomac in early May of 1864.  These 6,000 documented head produced approximately 2.7 million rations, enough to supply an army of 125,000 for 21½ days.

The 6,000 head were gathered from holding pens in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Washington, D.C.  How did 6,000 head of cattle get to the Army of the Potomac for the Overland Campaign?

An excerpt from Feeding a Great Army ” in the United States Service Magazine in February 1880 by Brevet Brigadier General Thomas Wilson tells how:

“…to carry out my orders of supply, it would be necessary to have sent up to the front from Alexandria, some 50 miles distant, about 6,000 head of beef cattle, with the forage, corn in the ear, and hay necessary to subsist them until the march began, and this feat had to be accomplished between one Friday morning and the next Tuesday night; or, in other words… an average of 1,200 head of beef cattle had to be sent daily by me for five days, with the necessary forage for their maintenance.

The existing capacity of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad in cattle cars was, at this time, for only 300 head daily…

The sudden call and the subsequent remarkable feat of shipping 6,000 cattle over this road of a single track, in the time required and with its limited resources was accomplished by the authorities seizing all the flat cars within reach and placing fences around them…  In this manner, 1,800 head were sent up in one day of twenty-four hours.  At one time during the shipment an endless train of cattle cars was in transit, most of the railroad sidings being filled with them…  We received all the cattle asked for before the time needed.

Three hundred men were kept constantly employed in unloading the cattle cars on their arrival at the front, so that the emptied cars might be sent back without delay.”

The herds and animals that we see today in the rural parts of Spotsylvania and Orange Counties are insignificant when compared to those that travelled with General Grant.  The Army of the Potomac had more than 50,000 horses and mules and at least 6,000 head of beef.  Big armies meant big numbers.

Author: Rod Lackey
Date: July 2018

Read Previous Chapter 11: the Unfinished Railroad in the Battle of the Wilderness

Whether you’re looking for homes for sale in Lake of the Woods VA or Waterfront property in Virginia we are your Real Estate Advisors for Stafford, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Locust Grove, Central Virginia, and Greater Virginia. Thinking of selling? In any market condition, “what is my home worth?” is the #1 question asked by home owners. If you wish to sell your home, it needs to be sold for top dollar and in a timely manner. Pricing your home accurately, Pat will partner with you to make the selling process so much easier. Get started today by calling us at (540) 388-2541 or contact Pat Licata.

To see available Lake of the Woods properties, please visit our site.

History in Our Backyard Chapter 11: the Unfinished Railroad in the Battle of the Wilderness

Chapter 10 described the history of the “unfinished railroad.”  This article tells how it was used during one of the Civil War’s battles.

Exhibit 14 General Wadsworth Monument

May 6, 1864 was a day of changing fortunes as the Union fought the Confederates along Orange Plank Rd.  It began with a 5 AM attack by the Union II Corps, reinforced by divisions from V and VI Corps, under command of General Hancock.  The attack drove General A.P. Hill’s III Corps from its positions.  They fled west towards Parker’s Store.  The 7 AM arrival of General Longstreet’s I Corps stemmed the rout.  Longstreet’s counter attack at Tapp Field drove the Federals back toward their starting positions to the east.  By 10 AM the two armies were at a standstill facing each other astride Orange Plank in the vicinity of the monument to Union General James Wadsworth.

Exhibit 15: Unfinished Railroad Cut

General Lee sent his Chief Engineer, General Smith, to see if there was a way to break the stalemate.  Smith and his party walked east along the unfinished railroad, which lay south of the Union’s flank. Both armies were aware of the unfinished railroad about ¼ mile south of and parallel to Orange Plank.  In the chaos of battle, neither army had thought about using it as an attack route, or about defending it against such an attack, until Smith’s reconnaissance.  Smith found the railroad grade undefended.  He returned and reported his findings to Longstreet. 

Longstreet sent four brigades to attack the Union flank under the command of his aide Lt. Col. Sorrel.  Sorrel arranged the men along the railroad grade and, when all men were in position, began the attack shortly after 11 AM.  It burst upon the Union flank in total surprise.  In addition, as soon as the fighting started on the flank, Longstreet’s remaining troops attacked the Union’s front.

McAlister’s brigade on the Union flank was first to feel the Confederate onslaught.  It was quickly routed.  Soon all eight Union brigades south of Orange plank had collapsed like dominos.  Union General Wadsworth, in command of Union forces north of Orange Plank, heroically attempted to organize a defense on the north side of the road.  It was to no avail leaving him mortally wounded.  By 12:30 PM, all Union positions had been overrun with the defenders withdrawing east to Brock Road or north to the Lacy House (Ellwood Manor).

The Confederate’s success quickly turned to failure.  While riding to the front to direct a continued advance, General Longstreet was accidentally shot by soldiers of the 12th Virginia of Mahone’s Brigade. While he survived, it wasn’t until four hours later that the Confederates were able to reorganize and resume the attack.  By then the Union had strengthened its defenses along Brock Road.  The renewed attack failed.  In addition to the short term loss, it would be months before Longstreet recovered sufficiently to resume command.

Author: John Bell

Date: July 2018

Read Previous Chapter. Chapter 10: The Unfinished Railroad

Continue to Chapter 12: Beef on the Hoof

Whether you’re looking for homes for sale in Lake of the Woods VA or Waterfront property in Virginia we are your Real Estate Advisors for Stafford, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Locust Grove, Central Virginia, and Greater Virginia. Thinking of selling? In any market condition, “what is my home worth?” is the #1 question asked by home owners. If you wish to sell your home, it needs to be sold for top dollar and in a timely manner. Pricing your home accurately, Pat will partner with you to make the selling process so much easier. Get started today by calling us at (540) 388-2541 or contact Pat Licata.

To see available Lake of the Woods properties, please visit our site.

History in Our Backyard Chapter 10: The “Unfinished Railroad”

The term “unfinished railroad” refers to the roadbed without track that existed during the Civil War.  This article will give a brief description of its history. Another article will discuss its use specifically during the Civil War period.

Exhibit 12 Standard Gauge (left) vs. Narrow Gauge

The “unfinished railroad” had a role in the Civil War, but later it was two different working railroads run on the same roadbed. Although incorporated in 1853 no track had been laid as the Civil War began. Running between Orange and Fredericksburg, it existed under several names and configurations existing operationally from 1877 until 1984. The first line was narrow gauge, best known as the Potomac, Fredericksburg and Piedmont Railroad (PF&P). It provided passenger and freight service for almost fifty years. The second venture was standard gauge. It also hauled freight and passengers under the name of the Virginia Central Railway between 1927 to1937 and freight within Fredericksburg until 1984.

Incorporated in 1853, the Fredericksburg and Gordonsville Railroad Company’s (FGRRC’s) “purpose was to build a railroad between Fredericksburg and Gordonsville or Orange Court House in order to connect with the rail lines already running to Gordonsville.” The company failed by November 1857.  Road grading from Fredericksburg on 18 miles of the project had taken place by the time of the Civil War but no track had been laid, thus the “unfinished railroad” term. The project was resurrected in 1871. Some progress was made by the new company, however, after many delays, the State took possession of the railroad in December of 1873. It restored the property to the original owner, the FGRRC. In March 1876 the railroad was again reorganized and the name changed to the Potomac, Fredericksburg and Piedmont (PF&P), best known to locals as the “Poor Folks, and Preachers” due to its clientele. The first train to Orange arrived on February 26th, 1877.

PF&P showed a profit for many years. 1910 proved a banner year with 18,000 passengers and $56,000 in freight revenue. The high point for number of employees was 63 in 1920 but the decline was coming. The automobile and the truck “offered portal to portal service and substantial reductions in labor costs.” Furthermore the line could not interchange freight with mainline connections. In 1925 the line was sold and reorganized as the Orange and Fredericksburg Railroad but that was quickly sold to Langhorne Williams, a Richmond banker. The new name was the Virginia Central and the first upgrade was to install standard gauge track in 1926.


Exhibit 13 PF&P Engine and Tender

The line generally operated at a loss until it petitioned the Interstate Commerce Commission in 1937 to abandon the 37 miles between Orange and West Fredericksburg. It would continue to operate one mile of track in Fredericksburg as a switching operation for 15 industrial customers.  The Williams family continued to operate that line until 1967 when it was transferred to the city. The line was quickly recognized as a white elephant and although several schemes promised a profit, in March of 1984 the ICC approved final abandonment

Three excellent sources of reading are “Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad Historical Society, Inc.” Volume 5, Issue 4, Fall 2009, “The Virginia Central Railway,” Ames Williams, pages 18-28, Remembering: A History of Orange County, Frank S. Walker Jr., pages 252-256 and “Tracks Through Time; A Railfan Tour of Orange County, Virginia”, Frank S. Walker Jr., page 20, a pamphlet available at the Orange County Visitor Center.

Author: Bob Lookabill
Date: July 2018

Read Previous Chapter 9: Robinson’s Tavern

Continue to Chapter 11: the Unfinished Railroad in the Battle of the Wilderness

Whether you’re looking for homes for sale in Lake of the Woods VA or Waterfront property in Virginia we are your Real Estate Advisors for Stafford, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Locust Grove, Central Virginia, and Greater Virginia. Thinking of selling? In any market condition, “what is my home worth?” is the #1 question asked by home owners. If you wish to sell your home, it needs to be sold for top dollar and in a timely manner. Pricing your home accurately, Pat will partner with you to make the selling process so much easier. Get started today by calling us at (540) 388-2541 or contact Pat Licata.

To see available Lake of the Woods properties, please visit our site.

History in Our Backyard Chapter 7: Jackson’s Flank Attack & Wounding

On the evening of May 1, 1863, during the Battle of Chancellorsville, General “Stonewall” Jackson and Confederate commander General Robert E. Lee held an historic meeting sitting on a “cracker box” near the intersection of Plank and Furnace Roads.

They agreed upon a plan for Jackson to maneuver around the Union army and initiate a flank attack.  The next morning Jackson and approximately 28,000 troops, nearly half of Lee’s Army, started their march.  Charles Wellford, owner of Catherine Furnace, and his son guided them along back roads for 12 miles ending up on the right flank of the Union Army’s XI Corp.  Around 5:15 p.m., rebel soldiers attacked, routing the Union troops and pushing them back until nightfall.  Jackson considered pressing the attack but decided to conduct his own personal reconnaissance before committing to an unusual nighttime attack. 

Exhibit 7: Arm of Jackson

Jackson set out around 9 p.m. with his entourage.  His guide, 19 year old Private David Kyle, took them down a narrow road passing through Confederate lines and riding to within a few hundred yards of the enemy when Jackson’s staff cautioned that it would be too dangerous to go further.  They turned around, retracing their path when they were fired upon by their own soldiers, mistaking them for Union skirmishers.  Jackson was hit three times – once in his right hand and twice in the left arm.   His staff rushed to his side, summoned his surgeon, Dr. Hunter McGuire, placed Jackson in an ambulance, and transported him to a field hospital – a large tent at Wilderness Tavern – near today’s Routes 3 and 20 Intersection; there, Dr. McGuire amputated Jackson’s left arm.  Jackson’s chaplain, Beverly Tucker Lacy, carried Jackson’s amputated arm to Ellwood plantation, a mile away and owned by Lacy’s brother, where he buried it in the family cemetery; it remains there today.  When Gen Lee heard of Jackson’s wounding, he exclaimed that “Jackson may have lost his left arm, but I have lost my right arm!”  After his amputation, Stonewall Jackson was transported 27 miles to Guinea Station, near exit 118 on Interstate 95, where he died of pneumonia on May 10.

Visit the Chancellorsville Battlefield Visitor Center, off Route 3, to learn more about Jackson’s flank attack and even follow along the Jackson Trail.  Ellwood Manor on Route 20 offers an opportunity to view the burial site of Jackson’s arm and hike to nearby Wilderness Tavern.  Finally, Guinea Station is a shrine to Jackson and readily accessible off Interstate 95.                                           

Author:  Joanne Pino
Date: May 2018

Read Previous Chapter. Chapter 6: Relive the Battle of the Wilderness

Whether you’re looking for homes for sale in Lake of the Woods VA or Waterfront property in Virginia we are your Real Estate Advisors for Stafford, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Locust Grove, Central Virginia, and Greater Virginia. Thinking of selling? In any market condition, “what is my home worth?” is the #1 question asked by home owners. If you wish to sell your home, it needs to be sold for top dollar and in a timely manner. Pricing your home accurately, Pat will partner with you to make the selling process so much easier. Get started today by calling us at (540) 388-2541 or contact Pat Licata.

To see available Lake of the Woods properties, please visit our site.

History in Our Backyard Chapter 5: an Oral History (continued)

In April, 1875, the New York Sun reported that Anthony Smith, commonly known as Anthony Jones, died in New York at the age of 70. Smith was a former slave who had run-away from the Wilderness of Virginia. During his life in New York Smith had accumulated a considerable estate but had neglected to write a will. Lacking a legal heir, the New York Court System took control of his affairs.

On his death-bed interview, Smith told the story of his life. Once the property of William Jones, owner of the Ellwood Manor estate in the Wilderness of Spotsylvania, His master William Jones had become a widower in the 1820s and several years later William remarried Lucinda Gordon who brought with her to Ellwood Mansion a personal slave, Patsey.

Anthony eventually wooed Patsey and with the consent of their owners they took up housekeeping on the Ellwood Manor grounds. Four children were born to the couple, but only one, the fourth, survived. About the time of William’s death in 1845, Anthony ran-away from his then pregnant wife and the Ellwood estate. He was captured, returned to Fredericksburg and sold to a new owner. After a trip to the South with his new master, Anthony again escaped and made his way to New York City, where he lived out his remaining years. Following the Emancipation, Anthony attempted to restore contact with his family back in the Wilderness, but with limited success. Patsey did retain one of his letters and later cited it as proof of their marital relationship.

The story as related above was published in the New York papers sometime after Anthony’s death. It was soon picked up and published by Richmond, Virginia papers. As a result, two sets of claimants to Anthony’s fortune came forth to the New York Court. One, the remaining sister and brother of Anthony declared extreme poverty. They were represented by J. Horace Lacy, their former owner through his marriage to Betty Churchill Jones, William Jones’ second daughter and heir to Ellwood.

Exhibit 5 J. Horace Lacy

The second claimants were Patsey, his first wife, along with the sole living child who was born after Anthony’s first escape. They were represented by lawyers Alexander & Green of Fredericksburg. When interviewed by the New York court, Patsey explained that she had waited a number of years following Anthony’s departure before taking in a new partner. Though partnered, she claimed to have been the wife of Anthony (citing the letter she retained) and therefore a legal heir to his estate.

The New York Court wrestled with the judgment for nearly a year. They recognized that New York and Virginia laws on marriage differed considerably in the pre-war era. Numerous testaments and affidavits were heard or submitted. Many of the claimants appeared before the referee at least one time. In the end, based on Patsey’s proof of their pre-war marital relationship, the court sided with Patsey. She received the estate, then valued at $20,000, cash and property.

Author:  Bob Epp
Date: March 2018

Read Previous Chapter. Chapter 4: An Oral History of a Local Slave Family

Continue to Chapter 6: Relive the Battle of the Wilderness

Whether you’re looking for homes for sale in Lake of the Woods VA or Waterfront property in Virginia we are your Real Estate Advisors for Stafford, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Locust Grove, Central Virginia, and Greater Virginia. Thinking of selling? In any market condition, “what is my home worth?” is the #1 question asked by home owners. If you wish to sell your home, it needs to be sold for top dollar and in a timely manner. Pricing your home accurately, Pat will partner with you to make the selling process so much easier. Get started today by calling us at (540) 388-2541 or contact Pat Licata.

To see available Lake of the Woods properties, please visit our site.

34076 ridge view

Private Home on 2 Acres for Sale in Locust Grove Virginia 22508 Now Under Contract!!

34076 Ridge View Drive, Locust Grove, VA 22508

Are you ready to escape the hustle and bustle for some peaceful, country living yet still be conveniently close to the things you need? Look no further, this home is the best of both worlds boasting 2 acres of tree lined tranquility. I’m confident you will be anxious to call this home!

Whether you’re looking for homes for sale in Lake of the Woods VA or Waterfront property in Virginia we are your Real Estate Advisors for Stafford, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Locust Grove, Central Virginia, and Greater Virginia. Thinking of selling? In any market condition, “what is my home worth?” is the #1 question asked by home owners. If you wish to sell your home, it needs to be sold for top dollar and in a timely manner. Pricing your home accurately, Pat will partner with you to make the selling process so much easier. Get started today by calling us at (540) 388-2541 or contact Pat Licata.

To see available Lake of the Woods properties, please visit our site.

What to Look For When Searching For a Neighborhood in Orange County, VA?

Moving involves a couple of steps. The first one is making the decision and starting to look for a home. When you have a lot of options, it may be difficult to find the perfect spot for you and your family. Picking the right home is essential, but it’s not the only thing that will make your life nicer and happier. You need to find the right neighborhood, too. Choosing a neighborhood needs to be done carefully, so you pick one that suits your needs – depending on your lifestyle. So, if you are searching for a neighborhood in Orange County, VA, here are the things to look for.

Orange County VA basics

Orange County is a rural area which, though not so big, gives you the opportunity to enjoy amazing nature. With the population of around 33,000, it is a place of a diverse economy, proved to be very good for different industries and businesses. It’s located in the central part of Virginia’s Piedmont region, and its land is mostly made of hills, especially towards the Blue Ridge Mountains.

What to look for when searching for a neighborhood in Orange County, VA

Looking for the perfect neighborhood? Well, you’ll definitely find one in Orange County. The only problem is – which one suits your lifestyle the best? Here’s what you should consider before you start looking for a home.

If you have kids – look for good schools

Having kids changes your lifestyle and needs a lot. Therefore, when searching for a neighborhood in Orange County, VA, be sure to pick one that offers a nice school for your little ones.  Some of the best public schools in Orange County are:

  • Orange Elementary School
  • Locust Grove Elementary School
  • Unionville Elementary School
  • Orange County High school

However, this factor only counts if your kids are young and still need to go to school. You should think about the quality of their education and them traveling to school every day. Otherwise, there’s no need to pick a neighborhood according to the best school in the area.

 a man holding a toddler.
Figure 1 Moving with kids means you need to think about their future – as well as are searching for a neighborhood in Orange County, VA according to their needs

House prices

When searching for a neighborhood in Orange County, VA, finances play a great role as well. If you think of buying a home, be sure to browse Orange County house listings and see which place offers the homes you can afford. Find a neighborhood according to your finances so it will be easier to find a home there.

dollar bills
Figure 2 Unfortunately, finances are a significant factor when are searching for a neighborhood in Orange County, VA

Safety

Safety is one of the top reasons to choose or not to choose a neighborhood. Even though everyone wants to live in the safest area possible, sometimes finances don’t allow us to buy a home there. However, that shouldn’t worry you. Orange County, VA is a pretty safe place, but even so, you take a look at crime reports and consider them as a factor if you’re indecisive between two or three favorite neighborhoods. You can surely check the Orange County’s crime history online, so it makes the research even easier. Furthermore, be sure to visit the desired neighborhood and check it yourself. A safe and friendly e neighborhood is well-lit at night, with proper sidewalks and kids playing around.

Community

If you rather enjoy an inactive way of life, you wouldn’t mind living in a community that doesn’t interact. However, if you like social events like parties, markets, concerts, etc. – you may want to do some research on the community you want to live in. You can probably research online – on official websites or Facebook pages, but the best way is to talk to the people you meet. Ask the locals about the community events and top things to do in Orange County – and at the same time check if they are friendly to live with.

row houses
Figure 3 Do you really want to live in a dull community?

Job market

If you already don’t have a job, researching the job market is a good idea. This can be an important factor when searching for a neighborhood in Orange County, VA. You can pick a home close to your job and significantly reduce the commute time. Always keep an eye on Orange County Job Opportunities, so you can find something you really like.

Walkability

Being able to enjoy your neighborhood without constantly hopping into a bus or a train is a great factor when looking for a home. Be sure to find a neighborhood that gives you the opportunity to walk to work (if possible), favorite shops, restaurants, parks, etc. The best way to do it is by visiting the desired neighborhood. Of course, when moving across the states – that’s not always possible, but you can definitely research the area online using Google Maps.

Highway accessibility

If you need to travel often or commute to work, choosing a neighborhood that has easy access to highways is a must. Therefore, be sure to consider this as an important factor if your lifestyle requires frequent travels.

Religion

Many religious people want to live close to a church or synagogue. Therefore, it can be one of the important factors when searching for a neighborhood in Orange County, VA.

Be sure to move to Orange County safely

If you are moving from another state, you probably don’t know much about Orange County, or you are coming here for the first time. Therefore, when relocating be sure to do it safely and hire a professional to help you out. A reliable moving company like heartmoving.us can deal with your relocation so you can be sure that your items are in the safe hands. Moreover, a fast and efficient relocation is guaranteed. Just be sure to organize everything in advance and prepare yourself for the move. You can leave everything else to the professionals.

a couple getting a house key
Figure 4 With a reliable moving company – your relocation will be safe and easy!

Remember!

There is no perfect neighborhood. When you are searching for a neighborhood in Orange County, VA, you should remember that you can’t find everything you want. That’s why you need to see what the main factors you want to cover are when choosing a neighborhood. Other small details could be probably changed – or you can get used to it. Don’t look for the perfect place, but for the place you can live happily in.

Whether you’re looking for homes for sale in Lake of the Woods VA or Waterfront property in Virginia we are your Real Estate Advisors for Stafford, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Locust Grove, Central Virginia, and Greater Virginia. Thinking of selling? In any market condition, “what is my home worth?” is the #1 question asked by home owners. If you wish to sell your home, it needs to be sold for top dollar and in a timely manner. Pricing your home accurately, Pat will partner with you to make the selling process so much easier. Get started today by calling us at (540) 388-2541 or contact Pat Licata.

To see available Lake of the Woods properties, please visit our site.

302 Happy Creek

BEAUTIFUL Lake of the Woods LOT Now SOLD BY PAT LICATA!

302 Happy Creek Rd, Lake of the Woods VA 22508

Walk to the beach from this absolutely gorgeous, level lot in amenity-rich Lake of the Woods where your lake life can begin. Most of the lot has been cleared and sports the greenest grass, and many trees have been left in the back for privacy. Whether your passion is boating, water-skiing, kayaking, golfing, horseback riding, or simply taking in the breathtaking views from the clubhouse while enjoying a fabulous meal, from your own deck or yard, or from one of the beaches, you won’t be disappointed!

Whether you’re looking for homes for sale in Lake of the Woods VA or Waterfront property in Virginia we are your Real Estate Advisors for Stafford, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Locust Grove, Central Virginia, and Greater Virginia. Thinking of selling? In any market condition, “what is my home worth?” is the #1 question asked by home owners. If you wish to sell your home, it needs to be sold for top dollar and in a timely manner. Pricing your home accurately, Pat will partner with you to make the selling process so much easier. Get started today by calling us at (540) 388-2541 or contact Pat Licata.

To see available Lake of the Woods properties, please visit our site.